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This section offers papers from various sources from doctors, consultants and others, who are supportive of ME and the causes of the disease

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MYALGIC ENCEPHALOMYELITIS (ME) IN CHILDHOOD
The term Myalgic Encephalomyelitis was first used in this country in connection with the epidemic at the Royal Free Hospital in London in 1955. (Royal Free Hospital Group. An outbreak of encephalomyelitis Brit. Med. J. 1957, II, 895-904.)  Two hundred cases were documented and the disease was accepted as organic in nature by the physicians involved. The epidemic consisted of a viral meningo-encephalitis which left many of the affected with a more chronic illness.

Time to put the exercise cure to rest ?

There is ample evidence that M.E. is primarily a neurological illness. It is classified as such under the WHO international classification of diseases (ICD 10, 1992) although non neurological complications affecting the liver, cardiac and skeletal muscle, endocrine and lymphoid tissues are also recognised. Apart from secondary infection, the commonest causes of relapse in this illness are physical or mental over exertion 1. And, on follow up over decades (rather than weeks or months), the average person so disabled is found to be functioning (as a student, employee or parent for example) dangerously near their energy limits. The prescription of increasing exercise is such a situation (or in the early stage of the illness when the patient desperately needs rest) can only be counter-productive.

Differences Between ME & CFS

ME is a systemic disease (initiated by a virus infection) with multi system involvement characterised by central nervous system dysfunction which causes a breakdown in bodily homoeostasis (The brain can no longer receive, store or act upon information which enables it to control vital body functions, cognitive, hormonal, cardiovascular, autonomic and sensory nerve communication, digestive, visual auditory balance, appreciation of space, shape etc). It has an UNIQUE Neuro-hormonal profile

Mobility Problems in ME

ME (Myalgic encephalomyelitis) is a common chronic neurological disablement which affects between 300 and 500,000 individuals of all ages in the UK, most of them in the most socially and economically active population groups. The symptoms of this multi system disease are characterised by post encephalitic damage to the brain stem (1) (which contains major nerve centres controlling bodily homeostais) and through which many spinal nerve tracts connect with higher centres in the brain. Some individuals have, in addition, damage to skeletal and heart muscle.

THERE’S NO SMOKE WITHOUT FIRE!

ME commonly follows a virus infection, which, at first, appears to be trivial. However, the illness soon becomes distinguishable from other forms of post viral debility (including that associated with influenza) because of its prolonged course and tendency to relapse, making it inadvisable for sufferers to return to school, college or work without adequate convalescence. In a society which rates speed, sport and entertainment so highly, slowing down to rest will be unpopular and most young people will need some persuasion.

REDEFINITIONS OF ME/CFS – A 20TH CENTURY PHENOMENON

If the cause of a disease, the way in which it is acquired and the processes by which damage is caused are known, no definition is needed.  To the very few physicians still practicing today who began seeing patients with this illness some 40 years ago and who have continued to record and publish their clinical findings throughout, the current enthusiasm for renaming and reassigning this serious disability to subgroups of putative and vague “fatigue” entities, must appear more of a marketing exercise than a rational basis for essential international research.  It was not always  so unnecessarily complicated!

A Rose By Any Other Name

ME has already been called the ‘Disease of a Thousand Names’, yet, in the Spring of 2001, one of the ME Charities has just applied to the Charities Commission for another change. This time, it is from Myalgic Encephalomyelitis to Myalgic Encephalopathy, that is: from muscle pain accompanied by inflammation of the brain and spinal cord to muscle pain and damage to the brain and spinal cord of unknown origin. This clumsy euphemism will not only bloom less sweetly than it’s predecessors but does not fit the facts. For example, in reply to questionnaire sent to the most severely affected patients with ME in the UK, 2/3 ascribed their present condition to a virus infection.1 Moreover, this change will not benefit research nor relieve the confusion and disbelief which blocks access to standard medical care for these patients. It will, however, preserve the acronym ‘ME’ – a historical logo which still retains its integrity in many parts of the world and which, if replaced, would not only add to the present chaos, but prove extremely expensive in terms of office stationery.

IS STRESS MORE THAN A MODERN BUZZ WORD? - A 3 part document

By definition, stress represents any force, which threatens, or appears to threaten, the body’s natural equilibrium.  A certain amount of stress appears to be necessary, not only for keeping our stress reactions in working order, but to permit a musician, an athlete, an artist or a writer, for example, to give their best performance.  Nevertheless, too much stress can work in the opposite direction and give rise to illness.

THE IMPACT OF PERSISTENT ENTEROVIRAL INFECTION UPON CHRONIC NEUROLOGICAL DISEASE IN 2002

(PRESENTATION MADE TO 18TH ANNUAL NEWCASTLE RESEARCH CONFERENCE 30-31ST OCTOBER 2002
A. INTRODUCTION(1)
Viruses have been aptly described as “a piece of bad news wrapped up in a protein parcel”. Traditionally these minute microbial parasites have been considered difficult to detect by routine microscopic examination and culture. Evidence of their activity is usually based on the damage inflicted by the host’s immune response upon the host’s own tissues, such as cell damage and inflammation. In the absence of such evidence, the disease under investigation is often considered not to have been caused by a virus and indeed not to have any organic cause. This is a dangerous conclusion and may even lead to prejudice against many sufferers from serious, chronic life-long neurological diseases such as ME, Polio and their late effects as well as the autoimmune and other forms of damage arising in MS and Parkinsons disease which may sometimes overlap with ME and Polio.

RESEARCH INTO ME/CFS, 1988-1998 – Too much PHILOSPHY and too little BASIC SCIENCE!
1. WHAT IS RESEARCH?
It is simply an attempt to discover the truth. However, even in 1999, this search may still concentrate on one of 2 alternate pathways:
a) The METAPHYSICAL (or philosophical) route which seeks to establish truth purely by reason and argument.
b) The PHYSICAL (or scientific) path which sets out to determine facts by systematic investigation of material events and by experiment. 
The metaphysical approach bears much the same relationship to the scientific as ASTROLOGY (which involves the influence of the stars on human affairs) does to ASTROPHYSICS (which determines the chemical and physical composition of astral bodies).

STEM  CELLS  IN  THE  ADULT  HUMAN  BRAIN  -  Good  News  for  ME?(1.)

1.         INTRODUCTIONi)         What are Stem Cells?
After  fertilisation  of  manimalian  egg  cells,  a  small  cluster  is  produced  of  embryonic “stem  cells”  which  have,  at  that  time,  no  predetermined  function.  As  foetal development  progresses,  these  “uncommitted”  stem  cells  become committed to specialised work in supplying the specific needs of various  organs and tissues,  including  blood  forming  elements  and brain cells.

ME/CFS IN THE UK SCHOOL POPULATION

1.         THE PROBLEM Do children and adolescents suffer from ME/CFS?  Simple common sense tells most parents, teachers and doctors that they do and often more severely than adults.  Yet, there remains a sizeable proportion of professionals in Health Care, Educational and Social Services who are still prepared to ascribe the numerous, disabling but seemingly unconnected symptoms of this illness in young people to anorexia, depression, school phobia or a dysfunctional family background.  All are, at least, agreed that the illness presents a considerable economic, educational and social problem

SO YOU ARE GOING TO HAVE SURGERY? (Advice on anaesthetics and pain control for those with M.E.)

Introduction M.E. results in widespread neurological changes throughout the body, which may deteriorate in the older age groups (for example, some 20 to 30 years after onset of their illness).  Patients and carers should always take responsibility for informing, reminding, or carrying printed material to G.P.’s other doctors surgeons and dentists involved in planning surgery or making referrals.  The best person with whom to discuss this will be the anaesthetist on the team.  In case of emergency surgery make sure that relatives or friends accompanying the patient are aware of these problems and can speak to the surgical team.  This includes dentistry, orthodontic treatment, day stay or inpatient procedures.

Alternative Article by Dr Charles W. Lapp MD

Shall We Sleep No More?

Introduction:
It is a fact well known to all sufferers from ME that their illness (like MACBETH!)1. can murder sleep! In common with other people, they have unduly high expectations of lengthy uninterrupted rest every night. In addition to respite from sorrow, care and pain, everyone expects renewed energy and joy in living as well as short day time naps which can assist digestion and relieve boredom. It therefore comes as a shock to find out that the brain may be more active when “asleep” than when awake, indeed that tired out soldiers may continue to march and “sleep walkers” to creep about in the dark when technically unconscious!

PLECONARIL – A NEW DRUG FOR ENTEROVIRAL INFECTIONS

SIGNIFICANTLY GOOD NEWS FOR ALL WHO CARE ABOUT M.E. (MYALGIC ENCEPHALOMYELITIS)?

Can Hysteria Be Diagnosed With Confidence?

1998 will long be remembered in the UK as the year in which sufferers from Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (ME/CFS), so long misinterpreted by the media as an imaginary illness, finally took matters into their own hands and challenged the endorsement of that view by the Royal College of Physicians, Psychiatrists and General Practitioners 2. and the medical press 1..  After enduring unprecedented difficulties in obtaining

THE LATE EFFECTS OF ME - can they be distinguished from the Post-polio syndrome?
The following is a copy of the presentation made by Dr Betty Dowsett to the All Party Parliamentary Group at the House of Commons 31/01/01.

BRAIN PROBLEMS IN ME – IS THERE A SIMPLE EXPLANATION?

THE "TOO MANY SYMPTOMS" SYNDROME It may be that people with ME/CFS are so commonly and unfairly accused of hypochondriasis because they have too many symptoms to permit credibility. Alternatively, the casual observer may not have had time to listen, does not understand brain function or finds neurological research boring because it seems incomprehensible.

THE EPIDEMIOLOGY OF MYALGIC ENCEPHALOMYELITIS (ME) IN THE UK – 1919-1999

INTRODUCTION - Although ME is one of the commonest chronic neurological diseases in the UK today no official government sponsored statistical evaluation has yet been made.  We therefore have to rely on individual studies which suggest a point prevalence of some 300,000 sufferers

INFORMATION ON MENOPAUSE

The menopause is separate from ME.

THE IMPACT OF PERSISTENT ENTEROVIRAL INFECTION UPON CHRONIC NEUROLOGICAL DISEASE

Viruses have been aptly described as “a piece of bad news wrapped up in a protein parcel”. Traditionally these minute microbial parasites have been considered difficult to detect by routine microscopic examination and culture......

THE ENIGMA AND THE PARADOX OF ME

WHAT IS ME/CFS?:
It is a disorder initiated by a common virus infection of which (rather like influenza) several strains circulate annually in the general population giving rise to sporadic cases or to local epidemics and world-wide pandemics at 10-20 year intervals.  Although clusters of  infection have always been recognised in families, schools and Health Care institutions, the vast majority of cases (especially in the very young) are symptom free......

THYROID FUNCTION IN ME – IS THERE A MAJOR DIAGNOSTIC PROBLEM?

It as been suggested that “scandalous medical ignorance leading to an epidemic of undiagnosed thyroid deficiency, underlies the increasing prevalence of  ME in modern times”(1.) . Can such a challenge be ignored? Does it stand up to my own experience of clinical and laboratory medicine in the NHS (including the years of epidemic and pandemic ME between 1965 and 1990)? Of course not! – but first we have to define the thyroid problems under discussion....

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(FORMERLY MERGE)

MERUK promote and fund research into ME (Myalgic Encephalomyelitis), CFS (Chronic Fatigue Syndrome) and related illnesses; they also aim to improve public understanding and to provide education and support into these conditions. 

The 25% M.E Group, with the aid of Dr Vance Spence and MERUK, will seek to provide information packs in the future on certain subjects. These then can be used to provide alternative ‘evidence’, giving guidance on how people with severe M.E. should be treated by different professionals

MERUK - The Gateway - North Methven Street - Perth - PH1 5PP

Charity No  1080201

Telephone and Fax: 01738 451234

meruk@pkavs.org.uk

Documents produced by MERUK

MERUK Publications

Support Research With MERGE

MERUK Conference CD Information

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Sample of items that have appeared in group newsletters

MERGE (MERUK) RESPONSE ON CMO'S WORKING REPORT

The report of the Chief Medical Officer's Working Group on CFS/ME of January 2002 is an advance on the widely-criticised Joint Royal Colleges report on CFS (1996). It gives an authoritative statement that CFS/ME is a genuine illness which imposes a substantial burden on the health of the UK population, and stresses that improvement of health and social care for people affected by the condition is an urgent challenge.

Severely Overlooked by Science

Ignored and invisible! When the authors of the Chief Medical Officer's report of 2002 coined that phrase they were referring to the exclusion of the most severely ill people with M.E. from community and social care provision. However, the same description also holds true for mainstream scientific research.

RESEARCH REPORT IN MYALGIC ENCEPHALOMYELITIS (ME)/ CHRONIC FATIGUE SYNDROME (CFS)

There is now so much literature from so many varying aspects of biology in ME/CFS that it is simply not possible to summarise it all in a paragraph or two. By calling the illness CFS we start with a conundrum - the name. This is a small point to many academics and clinicians but to sufferers and researchers alike it is a the hub of the enigma in terms of treatment and management and, also, for the researcher, in the classification and definition of cohorts - the hallmark of good science. 

Signs and Symptoms in the Eyes and other items

In the early 1990s, two reports appeared in the scientific literature reporting ocular (eye) symptoms in ME/CFS.

Quality of Life of Children with ME/CFS by ME Research UK

In Western societies, ME/CFS is thought to affect 50 to 70 children per 100,000. Most eventually improve, but some remain ill or even get worse over time. A report to the Chief Medical Officer of England concluded that ME/CFS represents “a substantial problem in the young”, while the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health has produced evidence-based guidelines on how best to diagnose and manage the illness in children.

Biochemical Abnormalities in Children with ME/CFS & Pain in ME/CFS

Illness in youngsters has a particular poignancy; the transformation of a bright, active child into one who is unable to go to school or play with friends is something that touches us all....

Are Arteries of ME Patients Stiffer Than Normal?

Over the past 3 years, the team at the Vascular Diseases Research Unit, University of Dundee has uncovered a range of potentially important findings in people with ME


New Research Project on Autonomic Function in ME/CFS

MERGE has recently changed its working name - to ME Research UK, a title which we think more clearly describes our main aims: to commission and fund high-quality scientific (biomedical) investigation into the causes, consequences and treatment of ME/CFS and to "Energise ME Research" globally. We also have a new logo - and hope you like it!


ME: A Muscle/Brain Disorder

Epidemics of Myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME) were reviewed by Acheson in 1959, and from 1934 to 1959 there were at least 23 well-documented outbreaks of epidemic proportions of a similar illness.

Loss of brain gray matter in ME patients

There is no doubt that central nervous system symptoms are part of the ME spectrum - as many members of the 25% Group already know! Indeed, they are as characteristic as the post-exercise malaise, myalgia or the myriad of other symptoms that people experience.

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ME Catalogue

A collection of articles by Margaret Williams and Professor Malcolm Hooper together with related documents written by other people (for example, the Countess of Mar, Professor George Szmukler, Professor Simon Wessely, Professor Michael Sharpe, as well as official reports and the PACE trial protocol). These articles have been available on the internet or elsewhere for many years but now for the first time have been brought together in one place.
Margaret Williams is the pen-name used by someone who spent her professional life in the British National Health Service (NHS), latterly in a senior clinical capacity for many years until severe ME put an end to her career. For professional and personal reasons she does not wish her own name to be in the public domain.
Malcolm Hooper is Emeritus Professor of Medicinal Chemistry at the University of Sunderland in the UK, and is an advocate for ME/CFS patients. He chaired the International Invest in ME Conference in 2008, 2010, and 2011. He is also the Chief Scientific Adviser to the British Gulf War Veterans Association.

 

Proof-positive-revisited

The PACE trial was instigated and carried out mostly by a group of psychiatrists well-known for
teaching that ME/CFS does not exist other than as an aberrant belief: their assumption was that
ME/CFS is a behavioural disorder that is amenable to behavioural interventions. The Investigators had
no evidence for their assumption and despite abundant scientific evidence to the contrary, it remained
their firmly-held belief.

Sensationalism versus Science?

The long-promised article by Michael Hanlon on the “war” surrounding the
neuroimmune disorder myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME) was published today in
the Sunday Times Magazine together with a photograph of Professor Sir Simon
Wessely (“This man faced death threats and abuse. His crime? He suggested
that ME was a mental illness”).

Leeds drops Immunology cover

It is noted that the Leeds clinic for CFS and ME intends to make financial savings by changing what is offered at its “specialist” clinic at Seacroft Hospital, one such change being that patients with ME/CFS will no longer have direct access to an immunologist (Yorkshire Evening Post, 28th April 2012).  The Leeds and Yorkshire Partnership NHS Trust reportedly stated: “As more is now known about chronic fatigue conditions…employing an immunologist directly is no longer necessary”.

More concerns about the current UK Welfare Reform

Attention is drawn to a letter recently sent to two high-profile members of The House of Lords by Douglas Fraser, a former professional violinist but now severely affected by ME/CFS

Defending the indefensible?

Professor Simon Wessely once again attempts to defend what has already been shown to be indefensible, namely his own beliefs about the nature of ME/CFS, including his belief that graded exercise therapy (GET) has “an impeccable safety record” (Simon Wessely; Health in mind and body; The Journal of the Foundation for Science and Technology: 2011:20:7: 9 –11).

Questions for Professors Frank J M van Kuppeveld and Jos W M van der Meer

Professors Frank J M van Kuppeveld and Jos W M van der Meer have recently stated in plain terms that “In the past, several infectious agents have been associated with CFS but none of these could be confirmed in subsequent studies….” (Lancet 4th February 2012: 379: 9814, e27 – e28 doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(11)60899).

Oh Lord, please don’t let me be misunderstood

Professor Simon Wessely has recently published his own account of his involvement since the late 1980s with what he refers to as Chronic Fatigue Syndrome but does not clarify that he and his colleagues regard CFS as synonymous with ME and that they regard – and treat—it as a behavioural disorder

"Grey” Information about ME/CFS

Compiled by Margaret Williams April 2011

Introduction

Apart from historical landmark information and the occasional quotation about ME/CFS from a medical journal published in more medically enlightened times, the following illustrations are mainly taken from the “grey” literature on ME/CFS. Grey literature includes international research conference proceedings, presentations and papers written by researchers and/or clinicians that have not been published in peer-reviewed journals. These include, for example, articles written for patients’ support group magazines such as The CFIDS Chronicle during the 1980s and 1990s (when the Chronic Fatigue & Immune Dysfunction Syndrome [CFIDS, a US term for ME/CFS] Association of America produced excellent Chronicles including “A CIFDS Primer” and “Physicians’ Forum” written by leading clinicians and researchers) and articles or reports (including case reports and parliamentary reports) that have not been published by commercial journals.

“Grey” Information about ME/CFS Part 2: 1991 – 1993

Compiled by Margaret Williams 5th May 2011

Letter written to the Secretary of State: July 2011

Re: The major discrepancy between your Department and the Department of Health
on the same medical issue

Extracts from Professor Leonard Jason’s Presentation at the NIH State of the Knowledge Workshop on ME/CFS
Bethesda, Maryland, 7th-8th April 2011

At the National Institutes of Health “State of the Knowledge” (SOK) Workshop on ME/CFS held in Bethesda, Maryland on 7th-8th April 2011, Professor Leonard Jason from DePaul University, Chicago, gave a hard-hitting presentation, repeatedly emphasising the absolute necessity for researchers to be looking at the same disorder.....

The involvement of the PACE Trial Principal Investigators and the Director of the Clinical Trials Unit with the Department for Work and Pensions
31st March 2011

Following publication of the PACE Trial results and mindful of the fact that the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) was a co-funder of the trial, it may be salutary to reflect afresh on the involvement of Principal Investigators Professors Peter White and Michael Sharpe and the Director of the Clinical Trials Unit (Professor Simon Wessely) with the DWP.....

PACE Trial Results: an Update

9th June 2011

In the interests of transparency and openness, Professor Hooper thinks it important to put in the public domain the fact that The Lancet has agreed to correct the Comment by Bleijenberg and Knoop in which they asserted that 30% of PACE Trial participants “recovered” with CBT and GET (Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: where to PACE from here? G Bleijenberg and H Knoop: DOI:10.1016/S0140-6736(11)60172-4).

Science versus Psychiatry – again

Malcolm Hooper and Margaret Williams 22nd July 2011

In her BMJ editorial in which she referred to “myalgic encephalitis” instead of the correct term “myalgic encephalomyelitis” (Ending the stalemate over CFS/ME: BMJ 2011:342:d3956), Fiona Godlee described the disagreement between the biomedical and psychosocial schools of thought about ME as “an unproductive standoff in which…all progress is being stifled by increasingly aggressive intimidation of researchers”.

The Media and ME

16th April 2011

Ever since the foundation of the UK Science Media Centre in 1999 – whose purpose is to ensure that the media deliver only headline science stories that accord with Government policies – the reporting of the biomedical science surrounding ME/CFS has been noticeable by its absence. Instead, there has been a wealth of spin promoting the benefits and success of CBT and GET for every disorder imaginable, including ME/CFS.

Wessely’s Words Revisited

Malcolm Hooper 30th July 2011

Tom Feilden’s notably excited introduction to his interview with Professor Simon Wessely about the disorder ME on the BBC’s Today programme on 29th July 2011 exemplified a failure to exercise the requisite journalistic neutrality when reporting a “story”

What is ME?

Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (ME) has been documented in the medical literature from 1934. The Wallis description of ME (not Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, known as CFS – see below) was in 1957. Sir Donald Acheson’s (a former UK Chief Medical Officer) major review of ME was in 1959. In 1962, the distinguished neurologist Lord Brain included it in the standard textbook of neurology. ME has been formally classified by the World Health Organisation as a neurological disorder in the International Classification of Diseases (ICD) since 1969 (ICD-8: Vol I: code 323, page 158; Vol II (Code Index) page 173). On 7th April 1978 the Royal Society of Medicine held a symposium on ME at which ME was accepted as a distinct entity....

Submission re: DSM-V and ME/CFS

(2ND RESPONCE 2011)

Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (ME) has been classified by the World Health Organisation (WHO) as a neurological disorder since 1969.  Currently it is listed in the International Classification of Diseases (ICD), chapter 6, under Disorders of Brain at ICD-10 G 93.3.

Extracts from Professor Leonard Jason’s Presentation at the NIH State of the Knowledge Workshop on ME/CFS

At the National Institutes of Health “State of the Knowledge” (SOK) Workshop on ME/CFS held in Bethesda, Maryland on 7th-8th April 2011, Professor Leonard Jason from DePaul University, Chicago, gave a hard-hitting presentation, repeatedly emphasising the absolute necessity for researchers to be looking at the same disorder. 

The involvement of the PACE Trial Principal Investigators and the Director of the Clinical Trials Unit with the Department for Work and Pensions

Following publication of the PACE Trial results and mindful of the fact that the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) was a co-funder of the trial, it may be salutary to reflect afresh on the involvement of Principal Investigators Professors Peter White and Michael Sharpe and the Director of the Clinical Trials Unit (Professor Simon Wessely) with the DWP.

The Media and ME

Ever since the foundation of the UK Science Media Centre in 1999 – whose purpose is to ensure that the media deliver only headline science stories that accord with Government policies – the reporting of the biomedical science surrounding ME/CFS has been noticeable by its absence. Instead, there has been a wealth of spin promoting the benefits and success of CBT and GET for every disorder imaginable, including ME/CFS.

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The Definition & History of
Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (M.E.) LINK

This monograph was prepared for the Amsterdam M.E. Conference September 2015. It has not been adequately spell and grammar checked by my staff. For this I apologize to the readers. There are undoubtedly errors also in composition but the story is essentially valid, as is the much overlooked history Of Myalgic Encephalomyelitis.
Byron Hyde MD, The Nightingale Research Foundation

Canadian Guidelines Extract

The Canadian Expert Consensus Panel has published a medical milestone, the first clinical case definition for the disease known as myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome. This definition is clearly a vast improvement over the CDC's 1994 Fukuda criteria, which led to misunderstanding in both research and treatment modalities by making "fatigue" a compulsory symptom but by downplaying or making optional the disease's hallmark of post-exertional sickness and other cardinal ME/CFS symptoms. ...

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MYALGIC ENCEPHALOMYELITIS: A BAFFLING SYNDROME WITH A TRAGIC AFTERMATH

The syndrome which is currently known as Myalgic Encephalomyelitis in Great Britain and Epidemic Neuromyasthenia in the USA* leaves a chronic aftermath of debility in a large number of cases. The degree of physical incapacity varies greatly, but the dominant clinical feature of profound fatigue is directly related to the length of time the patient persists in physical efforts after its onset: put in another way, those patients who are given a period of enforced rest from the onset have the best prognosis.

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Newcastle Research Paper

For those of us who are involved in the care of patients with this condition, the recorded work of Biorn Signurdsson (1913 - 1953) in connection with the Akureyrl outreach in Iceland which affected over 1000 patients, both children and adults, was repeated by Melvin Ramsay when he was involved in the outbreak in his hospital which became known as the ‘Royal Free Disease’ but defined by him as Myalgic Encephalomyelitis......

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POLIO VERSUS THE WEST NILE VIRUS: A DOUBLE STANDARD OF DISBELIEF- RICHARD L. BRUNO

On September 20, 2002, “The Washington Post” reported that the West Nile virus is for the first time affecting younger and healthier people and has caused at least six cases of “polio-like paralysis”, in arms, legs and even breathing muscles, causing several individuals to be placed on respirators.

MANAGEMENT  -  THE  STRESS  ANIHALATION  WORK  BOOK

(Notes  from  Richard  Bruno’s  Workbook)

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Waking Up To Chronic Fatigue

It affects around one in every 1000 people in the UK, yet it attracts only a fraction of the cash spent on other diseases such as HIV. Once derided as "yuppie flu", the symptoms of chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), which include cramps, sleeplessness, weakness and headaches, often go unrelieved. That could be about to change as physical evidence for CFS, otherwise known as Myalgic Encephalolmyelitis (ME), begins to stack up.

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The Battle for a Cure

When the CFS Research Foundation was launched in1993 we knew that we had a fight ahead of us. Twelve years later when we can examine the basis of the disease it is difficult to remember all the problems which faced us then and how we won through so that our present programme of gene research could go ahead.

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Severely Affected Patients Respond to B-cell Depletion Therapy

Back in May I attended the 2011 Invest in ME Conference and heard of a potentially important discovery from two Norwegian oncologists, Dr. Øystein Fluge and Professor Olav Mella. Like many keynote medical discoveries in the past, this happened quite by accident. Uniquely though, the research concerned severely affected ME patients.

ME/CFS is an organic disorder

Professor Malcolm Hooper      27th February 2014

Given the decades-long determination of the psychiatric lobby to re-classify and claim ME/CFS as a mental (behavioural) disorder, possibly as a Bodily Distress Disorder, it is encouraging to note that on 12th February 2014 the WHO publicly confirmed that: “Fibromyalgia, ME/CFS are not included as Mental & Behavioural Disorders in ICD-10, there is no proposal to do so for ICD-11” and that this has been accepted by the UK Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Health (Jane Ellison MP) who, on 25th February 2014 stated on the record: “The World Health Organisation is currently developing the 11th version of the International Classification of Diseases, which it aims to publish in 2017. No discussions have taken place between the Department and the WHO on the reclassification of ME/CFS, but the WHO has publicly stated that there is no proposal to reclassify ME/CFS in ICD-11”.

 

 

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